One thing is clear about the avoidable power vacuum in Nigeria: President Yar'Adua has lost the goodwill of a sizable number of the right-thinking people of Nigeria. The President has proved that, even as the Head of State,
he can be a subject of manipulation. He has demonstrated that power is
dearer to him than service: he can support any lie to preserve his
interest. He has shown contempt for the people and the constitution.
Yet he swore to serve the people and defend the constitution.

His failure in following the clear-cut constitutional requirement in temporarily transferring power to the Vice President represents neither servant leadership nor rule of law. It is unfortunate that the self-professed servant leader and rule of law protagonist would fail his own test.

The President and his advisers still have a window of opportunity
to do the right thing before it becomes too late for any redemption.
While wishing the President well, I pray history will judge him
favourably. We all have a hand in our destinies.

Tajudeen Alabede
Lagos

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Bro. Shams, i understand your sentiment. No matter how well organised or promising the legal system is, public opinion counts. This has nothing to do with people having 'professional' opinions. Otherwise, there would be no need for the media and freedom of expression.

I was in LASU for a year as a Mathematics student. We lived in the same hostel then.

Shams O'Muyiwa said:
Tajudeen: Thanks for the explanation. I am not oblivious of the intricacies as you have explained. My real point in essence is that, there is a procedure for this process. That procedure is well taken carte of and it is through the rule of law including the court. Those who are interested in the issue will be required to use the court process and if they have done so (as I suspect), they should accept the decision or appeal. Making it a nation-wide issue is not just a mockery of our democratic system, but our nation. Everyone now has their "professional" opinion about this matter and all previously hidden poisonous hatred are let loose. I have read people hating Yar'Adua for this and some calling for his death and wishing he does not return alive all because people hammered the issues too much with such vengeance and prejudice. Did you hear that some people are already asking the military to come back due to the president's absence? Why? What their impatience? Is there something for these people? Well, yes. Of course the public are not in the know, but those bringing it to the public domain have their hidden agenda. Everyone should just shut-up and let the due process sort itself out. If the court is corrupt and the legislators are corrupt, then we have a bigger problem and this issue is not going to sort out that problem but driving away the smoke. I am not a politician and no supporter of the president, but very embarrassed by our prank-playing-pikin attitude, our lawlessness and our lack of courtesy for one another, particularly a sick man! This is stomach churning. It makes me sick!
These are simple problems but we have turned them big to such magnitude that they currently threaten our national unity. Do you see my point? Let us follow procedures and avoid jungle justice and immaturity.
Yes, I'm ex-LASUite, I was in Humanities. Were you there too? Which course?
@ Shams O'Muyiwa, I can authoritatively state there is no due process presently in Nigeria, hence we cannot all "just shut -up" and allow un-due process mortify us further. If the American "just shut up" days, years before their independence, before their own constitution, still standing and working over 200 years later, they cannot be the most power nation in the world today. If the French peasants, lowly castes "just shut-up" there would not have been a French revolution ushering in an industrial revolution in Europe transcending into a more even distribution of wealth and opportunities for the people. It is not about Yaradua, we should stop placating this issue as a personal one, or better still, they should not personalise governance. Please I beg of you, do not slow this train down, do not chastise us to "just shut-up" not because of you and me, but because of our generations yet unborn. Something is brewing in the Nigeria nation that has never happened before – positive change. A change you can trust!
Oluwakayode: The Americans and the French did not start a revolution to chase after the smoke, they directed their energy on the fire that is burning them all -the core issue is identified and brought to the fore. Indeed, Nigeria needs a revolution and I will be amongst the first to lead one without fear or sentiment. I start one during Abacha's time. But my concern which you have to understand is that the current issue will not get the masses together, will not create the desired sweeping change that will last for a long time, and will not even give this nation the respect we desire in the international quarter. Rather it will divide Nigerians, it is driven by politicians who really need sanitation; and it will not bring the change that will affect the ordinary Nigerians. Consider the following issues for your revolution:
1. Force more transparency in the banking sector so that those who stole money, deliberately took government money with the intention of making it a bad debt and shared it amongst themselves along with their nannies etc. We demand that they must be prosecuted by the court and quickly too (because justice delayed is justice denied). Henceforth, you and I who have genuine business can walk into a bank and get loans which are not there because some powerful people have coveted them.
2. For a long time, govt have been subsiding fuel. When Abiola was asked during his presidential campaign, he said we are not sure govt need to subsidise oil because we don't have information which will help us reach a decision. Yar 'Adua has realised that these companied have been pocketing billions of Nigerian money without any justified reason, hence the scrapping of the subsidy, now those companies are crying crocodile tears and forcing fake scarcity. We need a mass movement to bring them to justice and stop them suffering Nigerians for nothing.
3. The Politicians are the biggest group of thieves and murderers. Even 419 people and drug barons are abandoning their trade and choosing a political career because that is where the goodies are and it is legit. We need to revolutionalise our politics, so that it is not only the highest bidder who can climb political offices. Everyone with rogue background must be weeded out. What about academics? My almost puke whenever I hear some of them speak. These are not our 1st Eleven; these are our 100th Eleven in a country where brain is not in short supply. We need professionals in Politics and in our parastatals. We need transparency and the masses must demand.
Yes, I don't dispute that we need a revolution, but we are currently misdirected. I will adjudge you to wait and see where this will end and what benefit for the people it will achieve. NONE! Don't follow this crop my friends, they are not genuine, neither are they intending to reach further!
BTW, did you say AUTHORITATIVELY that there is no due process in Nigeria? Please if you don't know say so! Nigeria is not a small and unserious nation. Our policies and white papers are some of the best in the world. Our problem is IMPLIMENTATION which is undermined by corruption, favouritism and sabotage. We cannot say we lack something we have if we do not use it. That is a wrong approach.

Oluwakayode Adeyemi said:
@ Shams O'Muyiwa, I can authoritatively state there is no due process presently in Nigeria, hence we cannot all "just shut -up" and allow un-due process mortify us further. If the American "just shut up" days, years before their independence, before their own constitution, still standing and working over 200 years later, they cannot be the most power nation in the world today. If the French peasants, lowly castes "just shut-up" there would not have been a French revolution ushering in an industrial revolution in Europe transcending into a more even distribution of wealth and opportunities for the people. It is not about Yaradua, we should stop placating this issue as a personal one, or better still, they should not personalise governance. Please I beg of you, do not slow this train down, do not chastise us to "just shut-up" not because of you and me, but because of our generations yet unborn. Something is brewing in the Nigeria nation that has never happened before – positive change. A change you can trust!
@ Shams O'Muyiwa, you have just helped in buttressing my point by elucidating on it. Yes AUTHORITATIVELY with facts within my knowledge. Those issues you laid out as undermining IMPLEMENTATION are some of the reasons there is no due process. Lack of implementation of the most brilliant policies and white papers in the world is due to lack of due process. If there is due process, the system will operate in auto trail mode. I will give you examples from the 3 arms of government we have.

JUDICIARY:

In Nigeria, you can get away with murder. This is a statement of fact. This is because the system of justice and policing justice is not entrenched. A man charged with a criminal offence contested election while in prison and won. What due process allowed this to happen?

LEGISLATURE:

In the 21st century Nigeria, we have some law makers in some of our state house of assemblies who did not attend a higher institution of learning, nay, not only that, I dare say was a vulganiser by profession. Even if one is blessed with native intelligence, what understanding will such an individual bring into the process of law making? What due process got him there?

EXECUTIVE:

Need I say anything here? You will agree with me we have a bunch of unqualified public officers that have brought the nation into disrepute by their wanton display of crass irresponsibility, and when found out, rather for them to resign still hold on to the position because of their god-father or god-mother. What due process got them there and/or did not prune them?

I can understand your skepticism about the present bunch of politicians, but who will bell the cart for the much desired change we need. How long can and should we wait for. Democracy and development is always an evolving process, let us be the good voice amongst the rest that will champion this much needed change. The change we need for now is going back to the document that binds all of us together and make sure it works by designing processes and making sure they are adhered to.


Shams O'Muyiwa said:
Oluwakayode: The Americans and the French did not start a revolution to chase after the smoke, they directed their energy on the fire that is burning them all -the core issue is identified and brought to the fore. Indeed, Nigeria needs a revolution and I will be amongst the first to lead one without fear or sentiment. I start one during Abacha's time. But my concern which you have to understand is that the current issue will not get the masses together, will not create the desired sweeping change that will last for a long time, and will not even give this nation the respect we desire in the international quarter. Rather it will divide Nigerians, it is driven by politicians who really need sanitation; and it will not bring the change that will affect the ordinary Nigerians. Consider the following issues for your revolution:
1. Force more transparency in the banking sector so that those who stole money, deliberately took government money with the intention of making it a bad debt and shared it amongst themselves along with their nannies etc. We demand that they must be prosecuted by the court and quickly too (because justice delayed is justice denied). Henceforth, you and I who have genuine business can walk into a bank and get loans which are not there because some powerful people have coveted them.
2. For a long time, govt have been subsiding fuel. When Abiola was asked during his presidential campaign, he said we are not sure govt need to subsidise oil because we don't have information which will help us reach a decision. Yar 'Adua has realised that these companied have been pocketing billions of Nigerian money without any justified reason, hence the scrapping of the subsidy, now those companies are crying crocodile tears and forcing fake scarcity. We need a mass movement to bring them to justice and stop them suffering Nigerians for nothing.
3. The Politicians are the biggest group of thieves and murderers. Even 419 people and drug barons are abandoning their trade and choosing a political career because that is where the goodies are and it is legit. We need to revolutionalise our politics, so that it is not only the highest bidder who can climb political offices. Everyone with rogue background must be weeded out. What about academics? My almost puke whenever I hear some of them speak. These are not our 1st Eleven; these are our 100th Eleven in a country where brain is not in short supply. We need professionals in Politics and in our parastatals. We need transparency and the masses must demand.
Yes, I don't dispute that we need a revolution, but we are currently misdirected. I will adjudge you to wait and see where this will end and what benefit for the people it will achieve. NONE! Don't follow this crop my friends, they are not genuine, neither are they intending to reach further!
BTW, did you say AUTHORITATIVELY that there is no due process in Nigeria? Please if you don't know say so! Nigeria is not a small and unserious nation. Our policies and white papers are some of the best in the world. Our problem is IMPLIMENTATION which is undermined by corruption, favouritism and sabotage. We cannot say we lack something we have if we do not use it. That is a wrong approach.

Oluwakayode Adeyemi said:
@ Shams O'Muyiwa, I can authoritatively state there is no due process presently in Nigeria, hence we cannot all "just shut -up" and allow un-due process mortify us further. If the American "just shut up" days, years before their independence, before their own constitution, still standing and working over 200 years later, they cannot be the most power nation in the world today. If the French peasants, lowly castes "just shut-up" there would not have been a French revolution ushering in an industrial revolution in Europe transcending into a more even distribution of wealth and opportunities for the people. It is not about Yaradua, we should stop placating this issue as a personal one, or better still, they should not personalise governance. Please I beg of you, do not slow this train down, do not chastise us to "just shut-up" not because of you and me, but because of our generations yet unborn. Something is brewing in the Nigeria nation that has never happened before – positive change. A change you can trust!
Oluwakayode: Thanks for your response. Reading your last post, I can see exactly where we are and at what point we part. We are agreed completely on the need to change and surprisingly we generally agree on how. Our disagreements are somewhat semantic and pedantic. Semantics on “due process” and pedantic on “the reach of the current palava”.

There is due process in Nigeria. Our democracy or system of government is holistic and wholesome. The problem of corruption does NOT imply the absence of due process. Due Process is a designated system of tackling a problem or a task. It is a procedure or course of action entrenched in a system.

To justify this claim, I want you to remember that the same judiciary you have claimed has no due process is responsible for over-turning two election result (albeit after two years) in Ekiti and Oyo States. National Assembly members were relieved of their seats and real winners legally took over. There is due process and it would work even against the ruling PDP party in both states.
Further, in the dispute involving Lagos State and the Federal Government over the creation of Local Government (Development) Area, the judiciary was up to the task and balanced without bowing to Federal Authorities. There are people who have not been checked very well and are in power (exco or assembly), there is a process to sort this problem out, but have the process been utilised. You can’t blame the process if it is not triede. NO matter what system we supplement and re-introduce, it will fail abysmally following the same fate as the current system. So the problem is implementation and monitoring. This is where we come in –Monitor those in power and call them to task or call the system to task.
For democracy to function, it doesn’t only require the Executive, Legislator and the Judiciary, it also require a vibrant public. The Nigerian public is not vibrant, watchful and demanding. We are not faithful followers. I can understand why. We are not involved, the money that is embezzled isn’t ours and we are also hopeful that one day it will be our turn or someone close to us. Further, we are helpless, there is nothing we can do, nobody is listening, we can’t even win in the court etc. We need social re-engineering and moral re-alignment. We need three things:
1. Social Justice
2. Legal Justice
3. Conscientious Patriotism
Our revolution MUST establish these three key elements for our lovely nation to begin to move forward. This is why I am not persuaded by any funny opportunistic arcane group of self-serving pseudo-politicians. This is our pedantic partitioning. Its all for the best, after our parents’ generation was described by Wole Soyinka as the wasted generation, I wonder what ours will be called considering the fact that our generation fills the Houses of Assembly (at all level), yet they are clearly showing to us that “the beautiful ones are not yet born.”
Do take care.


Oluwakayode Adeyemi said:
@ Shams O'Muyiwa, you have just helped in buttressing my point by elucidating on it. Yes AUTHORITATIVELY with facts within my knowledge. Those issues you laid out as undermining IMPLEMENTATION are some of the reasons there is no due process. Lack of implementation of the most brilliant policies and white papers in the world is due to lack of due process. If there is due process, the system will operate in auto trail mode. I will give you examples from the 3 arms of government we have.

JUDICIARY:

In Nigeria, you can get away with murder. This is a statement of fact. This is because the system of justice and policing justice is not entrenched. A man charged with a criminal offence contested election while in prison and won. What due process allowed this to happen?

LEGISLATURE:

In the 21st century Nigeria, we have some law makers in some of our state house of assemblies who did not attend a higher institution of learning, nay, not only that, I dare say was a vulganiser by profession. Even if one is blessed with native intelligence, what understanding will such an individual bring into the process of law making? What due process got him there?

EXECUTIVE:

Need I say anything here? You will agree with me we have a bunch of unqualified public officers that have brought the nation into disrepute by their wanton display of crass irresponsibility, and when found out, rather for them to resign still hold on to the position because of their god-father or god-mother. What due process got them there and/or did not prune them?

I can understand your skepticism about the present bunch of politicians, but who will bell the cart for the much desired change we need. How long can and should we wait for. Democracy and development is always an evolving process, let us be the good voice amongst the rest that will champion this much needed change. The change we need for now is going back to the document that binds all of us together and make sure it works by designing processes and making sure they are adhered to.


Shams O'Muyiwa said:
Oluwakayode: The Americans and the French did not start a revolution to chase after the smoke, they directed their energy on the fire that is burning them all -the core issue is identified and brought to the fore. Indeed, Nigeria needs a revolution and I will be amongst the first to lead one without fear or sentiment. I start one during Abacha's time. But my concern which you have to understand is that the current issue will not get the masses together, will not create the desired sweeping change that will last for a long time, and will not even give this nation the respect we desire in the international quarter. Rather it will divide Nigerians, it is driven by politicians who really need sanitation; and it will not bring the change that will affect the ordinary Nigerians. Consider the following issues for your revolution:
1. Force more transparency in the banking sector so that those who stole money, deliberately took government money with the intention of making it a bad debt and shared it amongst themselves along with their nannies etc. We demand that they must be prosecuted by the court and quickly too (because justice delayed is justice denied). Henceforth, you and I who have genuine business can walk into a bank and get loans which are not there because some powerful people have coveted them.
2. For a long time, govt have been subsiding fuel. When Abiola was asked during his presidential campaign, he said we are not sure govt need to subsidise oil because we don't have information which will help us reach a decision. Yar 'Adua has realised that these companied have been pocketing billions of Nigerian money without any justified reason, hence the scrapping of the subsidy, now those companies are crying crocodile tears and forcing fake scarcity. We need a mass movement to bring them to justice and stop them suffering Nigerians for nothing.
3. The Politicians are the biggest group of thieves and murderers. Even 419 people and drug barons are abandoning their trade and choosing a political career because that is where the goodies are and it is legit. We need to revolutionalise our politics, so that it is not only the highest bidder who can climb political offices. Everyone with rogue background must be weeded out. What about academics? My almost puke whenever I hear some of them speak. These are not our 1st Eleven; these are our 100th Eleven in a country where brain is not in short supply. We need professionals in Politics and in our parastatals. We need transparency and the masses must demand.
Yes, I don't dispute that we need a revolution, but we are currently misdirected. I will adjudge you to wait and see where this will end and what benefit for the people it will achieve. NONE! Don't follow this crop my friends, they are not genuine, neither are they intending to reach further!
BTW, did you say AUTHORITATIVELY that there is no due process in Nigeria? Please if you don't know say so! Nigeria is not a small and unserious nation. Our policies and white papers are some of the best in the world. Our problem is IMPLIMENTATION which is undermined by corruption, favouritism and sabotage. We cannot say we lack something we have if we do not use it. That is a wrong approach.

Oluwakayode Adeyemi said:
@ Shams O'Muyiwa, I can authoritatively state there is no due process presently in Nigeria, hence we cannot all "just shut -up" and allow un-due process mortify us further. If the American "just shut up" days, years before their independence, before their own constitution, still standing and working over 200 years later, they cannot be the most power nation in the world today. If the French peasants, lowly castes "just shut-up" there would not have been a French revolution ushering in an industrial revolution in Europe transcending into a more even distribution of wealth and opportunities for the people. It is not about Yaradua, we should stop placating this issue as a personal one, or better still, they should not personalise governance. Please I beg of you, do not slow this train down, do not chastise us to "just shut-up" not because of you and me, but because of our generations yet unborn. Something is brewing in the Nigeria nation that has never happened before – positive change. A change you can trust!
Shams and Kayode: Thanks for the profound and intellectually stimulating debate. It seems we are all on the same page. I agree that change is coming to Nigeria. It is beyond debate that the Nigerian public or the civil society is very weak. That's why our rulers find it easy to get away with their misdeeds. Here, the people count for little.

Shams, i think it would be begging the question to say that with the mere existence of policies and white papers that are not implemented, then we have due process. A good law that is not implemented is no law. The fact that such law is written won't help its case.

It's quite interesting that Shams too believes in the power of an organised civil society to help bring about the desired change in Nigeria. Without doubt, that 'mass movement' can't come about without the right atmosphere being created by public opinion. But beyond talking, the people must be well organised and well led.

Kayode, my worry about the current wave of agitation for good, responsible governance is its sustainability. Will it last? We've had so many false starts and dashed hopes in the past.

God bless Nigeria.

Shams O'Muyiwa said:
Oluwakayode: Thanks for your response. Reading your last post, I can see exactly where we are and at what point we part. We are agreed completely on the need to change and surprisingly we generally agree on how. Our disagreements are somewhat semantic and pedantic. Semantics on “due process” and pedantic on “the reach of the current palava”.

There is due process in Nigeria. Our democracy or system of government is holistic and wholesome. The problem of corruption does NOT imply the absence of due process. Due Process is a designated system of tackling a problem or a task. It is a procedure or course of action entrenched in a system.

To justify this claim, I want you to remember that the same judiciary you have claimed has no due process is responsible for over-turning two election result (albeit after two years) in Ekiti and Oyo States. National Assembly members were relieved of their seats and real winners legally took over. There is due process and it would work even against the ruling PDP party in both states.
Further, in the dispute involving Lagos State and the Federal Government over the creation of Local Government (Development) Area, the judiciary was up to the task and balanced without bowing to Federal Authorities. There are people who have not been checked very well and are in power (exco or assembly), there is a process to sort this problem out, but have the process been utilised. You can’t blame the process if it is not triede. NO matter what system we supplement and re-introduce, it will fail abysmally following the same fate as the current system. So the problem is implementation and monitoring. This is where we come in –Monitor those in power and call them to task or call the system to task.
For democracy to function, it doesn’t only require the Executive, Legislator and the Judiciary, it also require a vibrant public. The Nigerian public is not vibrant, watchful and demanding. We are not faithful followers. I can understand why. We are not involved, the money that is embezzled isn’t ours and we are also hopeful that one day it will be our turn or someone close to us. Further, we are helpless, there is nothing we can do, nobody is listening, we can’t even win in the court etc. We need social re-engineering and moral re-alignment. We need three things:
1. Social Justice
2. Legal Justice
3. Conscientious Patriotism
Our revolution MUST establish these three key elements for our lovely nation to begin to move forward. This is why I am not persuaded by any funny opportunistic arcane group of self-serving pseudo-politicians. This is our pedantic partitioning. Its all for the best, after our parents’ generation was described by Wole Soyinka as the wasted generation, I wonder what ours will be called considering the fact that our generation fills the Houses of Assembly (at all level), yet they are clearly showing to us that “the beautiful ones are not yet born.”
Do take care.


Oluwakayode Adeyemi said:
@ Shams O'Muyiwa, you have just helped in buttressing my point by elucidating on it. Yes AUTHORITATIVELY with facts within my knowledge. Those issues you laid out as undermining IMPLEMENTATION are some of the reasons there is no due process. Lack of implementation of the most brilliant policies and white papers in the world is due to lack of due process. If there is due process, the system will operate in auto trail mode. I will give you examples from the 3 arms of government we have.

JUDICIARY:

In Nigeria, you can get away with murder. This is a statement of fact. This is because the system of justice and policing justice is not entrenched. A man charged with a criminal offence contested election while in prison and won. What due process allowed this to happen?

LEGISLATURE:

In the 21st century Nigeria, we have some law makers in some of our state house of assemblies who did not attend a higher institution of learning, nay, not only that, I dare say was a vulganiser by profession. Even if one is blessed with native intelligence, what understanding will such an individual bring into the process of law making? What due process got him there?

EXECUTIVE:

Need I say anything here? You will agree with me we have a bunch of unqualified public officers that have brought the nation into disrepute by their wanton display of crass irresponsibility, and when found out, rather for them to resign still hold on to the position because of their god-father or god-mother. What due process got them there and/or did not prune them?

I can understand your skepticism about the present bunch of politicians, but who will bell the cart for the much desired change we need. How long can and should we wait for. Democracy and development is always an evolving process, let us be the good voice amongst the rest that will champion this much needed change. The change we need for now is going back to the document that binds all of us together and make sure it works by designing processes and making sure they are adhered to.


Shams O'Muyiwa said:
Oluwakayode: The Americans and the French did not start a revolution to chase after the smoke, they directed their energy on the fire that is burning them all -the core issue is identified and brought to the fore. Indeed, Nigeria needs a revolution and I will be amongst the first to lead one without fear or sentiment. I start one during Abacha's time. But my concern which you have to understand is that the current issue will not get the masses together, will not create the desired sweeping change that will last for a long time, and will not even give this nation the respect we desire in the international quarter. Rather it will divide Nigerians, it is driven by politicians who really need sanitation; and it will not bring the change that will affect the ordinary Nigerians. Consider the following issues for your revolution:
1. Force more transparency in the banking sector so that those who stole money, deliberately took government money with the intention of making it a bad debt and shared it amongst themselves along with their nannies etc. We demand that they must be prosecuted by the court and quickly too (because justice delayed is justice denied). Henceforth, you and I who have genuine business can walk into a bank and get loans which are not there because some powerful people have coveted them.
2. For a long time, govt have been subsiding fuel. When Abiola was asked during his presidential campaign, he said we are not sure govt need to subsidise oil because we don't have information which will help us reach a decision. Yar 'Adua has realised that these companied have been pocketing billions of Nigerian money without any justified reason, hence the scrapping of the subsidy, now those companies are crying crocodile tears and forcing fake scarcity. We need a mass movement to bring them to justice and stop them suffering Nigerians for nothing.
3. The Politicians are the biggest group of thieves and murderers. Even 419 people and drug barons are abandoning their trade and choosing a political career because that is where the goodies are and it is legit. We need to revolutionalise our politics, so that it is not only the highest bidder who can climb political offices. Everyone with rogue background must be weeded out. What about academics? My almost puke whenever I hear some of them speak. These are not our 1st Eleven; these are our 100th Eleven in a country where brain is not in short supply. We need professionals in Politics and in our parastatals. We need transparency and the masses must demand.
Yes, I don't dispute that we need a revolution, but we are currently misdirected. I will adjudge you to wait and see where this will end and what benefit for the people it will achieve. NONE! Don't follow this crop my friends, they are not genuine, neither are they intending to reach further!
BTW, did you say AUTHORITATIVELY that there is no due process in Nigeria? Please if you don't know say so! Nigeria is not a small and unserious nation. Our policies and white papers are some of the best in the world. Our problem is IMPLIMENTATION which is undermined by corruption, favouritism and sabotage. We cannot say we lack something we have if we do not use it. That is a wrong approach.

Oluwakayode Adeyemi said:
@ Shams O'Muyiwa, I can authoritatively state there is no due process presently in Nigeria, hence we cannot all "just shut -up" and allow un-due process mortify us further. If the American "just shut up" days, years before their independence, before their own constitution, still standing and working over 200 years later, they cannot be the most power nation in the world today. If the French peasants, lowly castes "just shut-up" there would not have been a French revolution ushering in an industrial revolution in Europe transcending into a more even distribution of wealth and opportunities for the people. It is not about Yaradua, we should stop placating this issue as a personal one, or better still, they should not personalise governance. Please I beg of you, do not slow this train down, do not chastise us to "just shut-up" not because of you and me, but because of our generations yet unborn. Something is brewing in the Nigeria nation that has never happened before – positive change. A change you can trust!
@ Shams O'Muyiwa, I can’t agree with you more on our points of agreement and divergence. I must give it to you; you drive your points home succinctly.

But may I quickly reject to be part of an environment where if one or two celebrated good is done in the prevalence of multitude of injustice and miscarriage of justice then it is ok, I'll rather reckon with a community where it’s shocking where some injustice is done and seriously frowned at and quickly repelled. When a system does not work, the system need to be changed.

I trust we shall get there.

Many thanks.


Shams O'Muyiwa said:
Oluwakayode: Thanks for your response. Reading your last post, I can see exactly where we are and at what point we part. We are agreed completely on the need to change and surprisingly we generally agree on how. Our disagreements are somewhat semantic and pedantic. Semantics on “due process” and pedantic on “the reach of the current palava”.

There is due process in Nigeria. Our democracy or system of government is holistic and wholesome. The problem of corruption does NOT imply the absence of due process. Due Process is a designated system of tackling a problem or a task. It is a procedure or course of action entrenched in a system.

To justify this claim, I want you to remember that the same judiciary you have claimed has no due process is responsible for over-turning two election result (albeit after two years) in Ekiti and Oyo States. National Assembly members were relieved of their seats and real winners legally took over. There is due process and it would work even against the ruling PDP party in both states.
Further, in the dispute involving Lagos State and the Federal Government over the creation of Local Government (Development) Area, the judiciary was up to the task and balanced without bowing to Federal Authorities. There are people who have not been checked very well and are in power (exco or assembly), there is a process to sort this problem out, but have the process been utilised. You can’t blame the process if it is not triede. NO matter what system we supplement and re-introduce, it will fail abysmally following the same fate as the current system. So the problem is implementation and monitoring. This is where we come in –Monitor those in power and call them to task or call the system to task.
For democracy to function, it doesn’t only require the Executive, Legislator and the Judiciary, it also require a vibrant public. The Nigerian public is not vibrant, watchful and demanding. We are not faithful followers. I can understand why. We are not involved, the money that is embezzled isn’t ours and we are also hopeful that one day it will be our turn or someone close to us. Further, we are helpless, there is nothing we can do, nobody is listening, we can’t even win in the court etc. We need social re-engineering and moral re-alignment. We need three things:
1. Social Justice
2. Legal Justice
3. Conscientious Patriotism
Our revolution MUST establish these three key elements for our lovely nation to begin to move forward. This is why I am not persuaded by any funny opportunistic arcane group of self-serving pseudo-politicians. This is our pedantic partitioning. Its all for the best, after our parents’ generation was described by Wole Soyinka as the wasted generation, I wonder what ours will be called considering the fact that our generation fills the Houses of Assembly (at all level), yet they are clearly showing to us that “the beautiful ones are not yet born.”
Do take care.


Oluwakayode Adeyemi said:
@ Shams O'Muyiwa, you have just helped in buttressing my point by elucidating on it. Yes AUTHORITATIVELY with facts within my knowledge. Those issues you laid out as undermining IMPLEMENTATION are some of the reasons there is no due process. Lack of implementation of the most brilliant policies and white papers in the world is due to lack of due process. If there is due process, the system will operate in auto trail mode. I will give you examples from the 3 arms of government we have.

JUDICIARY:

In Nigeria, you can get away with murder. This is a statement of fact. This is because the system of justice and policing justice is not entrenched. A man charged with a criminal offence contested election while in prison and won. What due process allowed this to happen?

LEGISLATURE:

In the 21st century Nigeria, we have some law makers in some of our state house of assemblies who did not attend a higher institution of learning, nay, not only that, I dare say was a vulganiser by profession. Even if one is blessed with native intelligence, what understanding will such an individual bring into the process of law making? What due process got him there?

EXECUTIVE:

Need I say anything here? You will agree with me we have a bunch of unqualified public officers that have brought the nation into disrepute by their wanton display of crass irresponsibility, and when found out, rather for them to resign still hold on to the position because of their god-father or god-mother. What due process got them there and/or did not prune them?

I can understand your skepticism about the present bunch of politicians, but who will bell the cart for the much desired change we need. How long can and should we wait for. Democracy and development is always an evolving process, let us be the good voice amongst the rest that will champion this much needed change. The change we need for now is going back to the document that binds all of us together and make sure it works by designing processes and making sure they are adhered to.


Shams O'Muyiwa said:
Oluwakayode: The Americans and the French did not start a revolution to chase after the smoke, they directed their energy on the fire that is burning them all -the core issue is identified and brought to the fore. Indeed, Nigeria needs a revolution and I will be amongst the first to lead one without fear or sentiment. I start one during Abacha's time. But my concern which you have to understand is that the current issue will not get the masses together, will not create the desired sweeping change that will last for a long time, and will not even give this nation the respect we desire in the international quarter. Rather it will divide Nigerians, it is driven by politicians who really need sanitation; and it will not bring the change that will affect the ordinary Nigerians. Consider the following issues for your revolution:
1. Force more transparency in the banking sector so that those who stole money, deliberately took government money with the intention of making it a bad debt and shared it amongst themselves along with their nannies etc. We demand that they must be prosecuted by the court and quickly too (because justice delayed is justice denied). Henceforth, you and I who have genuine business can walk into a bank and get loans which are not there because some powerful people have coveted them.
2. For a long time, govt have been subsiding fuel. When Abiola was asked during his presidential campaign, he said we are not sure govt need to subsidise oil because we don't have information which will help us reach a decision. Yar 'Adua has realised that these companied have been pocketing billions of Nigerian money without any justified reason, hence the scrapping of the subsidy, now those companies are crying crocodile tears and forcing fake scarcity. We need a mass movement to bring them to justice and stop them suffering Nigerians for nothing.
3. The Politicians are the biggest group of thieves and murderers. Even 419 people and drug barons are abandoning their trade and choosing a political career because that is where the goodies are and it is legit. We need to revolutionalise our politics, so that it is not only the highest bidder who can climb political offices. Everyone with rogue background must be weeded out. What about academics? My almost puke whenever I hear some of them speak. These are not our 1st Eleven; these are our 100th Eleven in a country where brain is not in short supply. We need professionals in Politics and in our parastatals. We need transparency and the masses must demand.
Yes, I don't dispute that we need a revolution, but we are currently misdirected. I will adjudge you to wait and see where this will end and what benefit for the people it will achieve. NONE! Don't follow this crop my friends, they are not genuine, neither are they intending to reach further!
BTW, did you say AUTHORITATIVELY that there is no due process in Nigeria? Please if you don't know say so! Nigeria is not a small and unserious nation. Our policies and white papers are some of the best in the world. Our problem is IMPLIMENTATION which is undermined by corruption, favouritism and sabotage. We cannot say we lack something we have if we do not use it. That is a wrong approach.

Oluwakayode Adeyemi said:
@ Shams O'Muyiwa, I can authoritatively state there is no due process presently in Nigeria, hence we cannot all "just shut -up" and allow un-due process mortify us further. If the American "just shut up" days, years before their independence, before their own constitution, still standing and working over 200 years later, they cannot be the most power nation in the world today. If the French peasants, lowly castes "just shut-up" there would not have been a French revolution ushering in an industrial revolution in Europe transcending into a more even distribution of wealth and opportunities for the people. It is not about Yaradua, we should stop placating this issue as a personal one, or better still, they should not personalise governance. Please I beg of you, do not slow this train down, do not chastise us to "just shut-up" not because of you and me, but because of our generations yet unborn. Something is brewing in the Nigeria nation that has never happened before – positive change. A change you can trust!
Nice Post......

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